Review of Mean Girls

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Adapted from Rosalind Wiseman's book "Queen Bees and Wannabes", this teen comedy drama launched Lindsay Lohan's career in 2004. As 16-year-old Cady Heron, her character has just moved to an American suburb and enrolled in a public school after having been home-schooled in the African boondocks. She first befriends two misfits, but soon joins the three most popular girls in a group called the Plastics.
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Movie Review: "Mean Girls"

-- Rating: PG-13
Length: 97 minutes
Release Date: April 30, 2004
Directed by: Mark Waters
Genre: Comedy/Romance

This film is incredibly entertaining and brings high school cliques and drama to a whole new level. Navigating the social aspects of high school can be difficult but can make for some fantastic laughs in this comedy. There are scenes that will make you laugh, cry, and everything in between. No matter how far removed you are from the craziness called high school, this film will bring you right back and have you laughing at all the ridiculousness that went on within those school walls.

The movie centers on Cady Heron, played by Lindsay Lohan, as she moves back to the United States after spending the majority of her life in Africa. Having attended home schoolingfor the past 15 years and living in the African jungle, Cady is a beginner when it comes to socialization. There were no cliques in Africa, especially for home-schooled youngsters. As Cady begins to make friends and meet people, she learns that dealing with snakes and the dangers of the jungle is nothing when it comes to dealing with the social jungle of high school.

Cady's first two friends, Janis and Damien, are nerds. However, she then meets the other end of the spectrum in The Plastics, a group of three girls named Regina, Gretchen, and Karen, who are the pretty and popular girls of the school. From there, things get out of hand. Cady and Regina develop a furious rivalry, the entire school turns against each other, and bones are broken. The movie follows these hilarious events as Cady learns what true friends really are and how to just be herself.

The movie has developed a sort of cult following due to its extreme scenarios and characters. One of the best parts of the film is the way it draws from all of the classic stereotypes that are still found in schools but takes all of them to the next level in their portrayal in the film. This is done to allow viewers to see each group and connect them to groups in their high school, all while making everything seem entirely ridiculous and horribly entertaining.

The cast is full of familiar faces, and they all put on a great performance in the film. Tina Fey and Amy Poehler, both well known in comedy television, star as a dull math teacher and Regina's crazy mother respectively. Speaking of Regina, she is played by Rachel McAdams in one of her first major films. McAdams is hilarious throughout the film. She plays the self-absorbed, snotty, rich-kid Regina and makes the character evil and hilarious all at the same time.

Lindsay Lohan is not overshadowed by any of the other characters in this film. Like many of her early roles, Lohan plays the lovable outcast and protagonist who seems to always be trying to fit in, but not quite succeeding. She acts everything perfectly for her role. From the numerous arguments with Regina to her all-too-memorable speech towards the end, Lindsay Lohan acts these parts beautifully. Not only does she show her dramatic side, but she displays her funny side as well. She takes a witty script and makes it even sharper in the way that she plays the role of Cady.

There is romance in the film, too. In fact, it is the reason why the film is entertaining. Cady falls in love with Regina's ex-boyfriend Aaron. Despite the ridiculousness and hilarity that ensues as a result of this issue, the film touches on a somewhat somber reality, something it does quite often. It looks at the complex dynamic of dating and relationships in the high school environment. Though much of the pain and hurt is covered by blankets and blankets of jokes and slapstick comedy, there is still some truth hiding underneath.

The film uses this technique often. There are many very real issues touched on in the film, everything from moving schools to being an outcast of society to the pains of love. While the focus of the film is on making the audience laugh, there is still room for moments where the viewers can nod their head and think, "I remember that. That was pretty tough." The way that it connects to the real-life aspects of high school is what makes this movie both painfully realistic and outlandishly funny.

Movie lovers looking for a film that will keep them rolling on the floor in laughter should definitely watch this film. It hits on all of the major issues of adolescence while making them seem insane enough that viewers cannot help but laugh.

Rating 3 out of 5