Review of Magic Mike

Movie Description(Click Here To Hide)
Veteran stripper Magic Mike (Channing Tatum) teaches a new stripper (Alex Pettyfer) about the occupation. They work at the club Xquisite, which is owned by a former stripper named Dallas (Matthew McConaughey). Directed by Steven Soderbergh, the comedy film is based on Tatum's real-life experience as a stripper in Tampa, Florida when he was 19 years old.
3

Hellllo abs! Pulling together all the muscle-bound actors not already in the new “Expendables” movie, director Steven Soderbergh and Channing Tatum (the later working from his own life experience) pay tribute to men in uniform, who then strip those uniforms off.

Mike (Tatum) is a roofer by day, stripper by night, taking ne’er do well drifter Adam (Alex Pettyfer) under his wing, showing him the ropes of the dance club and, upon a twist of fate, getting him recruited into the squad of guys who dress up like Firemen, cops, Army, Navy, ect and let the ladies salute in their own way before getting a lap dance. It’s for this fantasy fulfillment that these guys escape the night with a waistband full of sweaty money. But Mike is unfulfilled and would like to start a hand-crafted furniture business. He’s also falling for Adam’s sister (Cody Horn), who’s wary of his sex and drug filled lifestyle.

This is traditionally stylized, single-cam, story-less and straight-forward Soderbergh, no moralizing or scandalizing the industry, and while every cliché from “wanting to be seen as more than just a stripper” to “one special girl” to “drugs are bad” is used here, it’s way more entertaining and accessible than I was expecting. Even if you’re not into assless thongs and chaps (not much full-frontal tho), guys doing perfectly choreographed dance routines to songs like “It’s Raining Men” before stripping down, or spray tanning and penis enlargement, there’s a really funny flick here centering on everything mentioned plus the buying of erotic clothing and Mathew McConaughey, playing the leather and cowboy hat-clad owner of the club with such infectious enthusiasm that everyone else pales in comparison. But it also has personal touches. Tatum makes a charismatic turn here, plus he’s one hell of an impressive dancer, but it’s his work in the later half where Mike confronts his lifestyle that is the best stuff of the actor’s career. He adds a deeper layer to a movie that is otherwise playfully entertaining.