Zero Dark Thirty triumphs at New York Film Critics Circle Awards

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For a decade, an elite team of intelligence and military operatives, working in secret across the globe, devoted themselves to a single goal: find and eliminate Osama bin Laden. Reuniting the Oscar winning duo of director-producer Kathryn Bigelow and writer-producer Mark Boal, this historical action thriller provides viewers with a real and suspenseful look inside history's biggest manhunt for the world's most dangerous man. Starring Jessica Chastain, Chris Pratt, Joel Edgerton & Mark Strong.
January 8th, 2013

'Zero Dark Thirty' has been honoured by the New York Film Critics Circle.

The prestigious group of 60 film buffs branded the gritty drama about the manhunt for Osama Bin Laden the Best Film of 2012, while Kathryn Bigelow picked up the gong for Best Director and Greg Fraser won Best Cinematography during Monday night's (07.01.13) star-studded celebratory dinner at New York's Crimson Club.

Oscar-winning filmmaker Katherine - who is also up for a Golden Globe along with the film's star Jessica Chastain - said: ''I used to get really nervous. I'm really shy. The last time I did the circuit, it beat it out of me . It's one of the highest honors I can imagine.''

Daniel Day-Lewis was chosen as Best Actor for Steven Spielberg's 'Lincoln', while Tony Kushner won Best Screenplay for the historical drama about the iconic US President's last months in office.

Matthew McConaughey also scooped up a prize for his Best Supporting Actor performances in raunchy comedy 'Magic Mike' and Richard Linklater's 'Bernie'.

He told the audience: ''Tonight I'm here because I did work that you liked. It feels good was able to humble myself to who these guys were. They're both outsiders. I had a ball diving into their obsessions.''

Rachel Weisz surprised everyone by earning the vote for Best Actress for her performance in small romantic drama 'The Deep Blue Sea'.

Meanwhile, Tom Hooper's elaborate musical film 'Les Miserables' and Ben Affleck's critically acclaimed 'Argo' missed out altogether.

The prominent film critics' society, founded in 1966, strives to promote film preservation and historically important features. This year's awards - seen as a precursor to February's Academy Awards - were dedicated to the late Village Voice critic Andrew Sarris.