Multi-tasker Matt Damon wrote Promised Land while watching the kids

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A 2012 drama film directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Matt Damon, John Krasinski, Rosemarie DeWitt, Frances McDormand & Hal Holbrook. Written by Damon and Krasinski and based on a story by Dave Eggers, the film tells the story of corporate salesman Steve Butler (Damon), who seeks drilling rights in distressed communities, and local man Dustin Noble (Krasinski), who looks to oppose the sale.
January 3rd, 2013

Matt Damon has learnt how to multi-task when writing scripts.

The father-of-four helped pen the storyline for new film 'Promised Land' with John Krasinski but admits he was easily distracted because he was doing it at home so his children were wanting his attention.

Matt - who also stars alongside John in the film - said: ''I've gotten much better at multi-tasking. It's hard, though. But, writing a script is not totally focused. You're taking little breaks, all the time. If a kid runs in, you give 'em a horsey ride, and then you're like, 'Okay, what we'll say is this . . .' It's a pretty fluid process. So, during those weekends we'd write, and then we'd go back to our day jobs and revise, mark up the margins and make notes, so that we'd be ready, five days later, to get back together and start putting that stuff in. It took shape really quickly and it was clear, pretty early on, that we were really going to do it.''

And Matt says John - who shot to fame in the US version of 'The Office' - was very good with his children but admits it wasn't a conventional way of working.

He told collider.com: ''He was doing the show ('The Office') and I was doing 'We Bought A Zoo', and he just started showing up to my house on weekends. He'd show up with breakfast and we'd eat and then start working. We'd work all day Saturday, and then have dinner. He'd help with the kids. I don't think he did diapers, but he definitely had kids crawling all over him. He was like, If you walked into the room and saw what was happening, you'd go, 'There's no way a script is going to come out of this!' ''